The top 10 chocoholic countries

Saturday, August 3rd, 2013. Filed under: Destinations Food & Dining
Switzerland is home to the most chocoholics in the world. ©Rob Stark /shutterstock.com

Switzerland is home to the most chocoholics in the world.
©Rob Stark /shutterstock.com

(Relaxnews) – In what should come as no surprise, Switzerland has emerged as the home of the most devoted chocoholics in the world, where the average resident ate nearly 12 kg of chocolate in 2012.

That’s equivalent to 240 chocolate bars a year.

According to figures from Leatherhead Food Research compiled by Confectionerynews.com, here are the top 10 chocolate-consuming countries in 2012, based on per capita consumption:

1. Switzerland 11.9 kg
2. Ireland 9.9 kg
3. UK 9.5 kg
4. Austria 8.8 kg
5. Belgium 8.3 kg
6. Germany 8.2 kg
7. Norway 8 kg
8. Denmark 7.5 kg
9. Canada 6.4 kg
10. France 6.3 kg

The US lands in the 15th spot.

vs/cm

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